Film & Digital: Embrace It All

A few years ago my Dad gave me my Granddad’s old camera. A 1966 Kodak. Fully manual. No batteries, slightly buffed-up lens, working mechanical light meter. An absolute gem.

It is only now that I have started to appreciate this masterpiece of photographic equipment. The lens may be slightly battered, but the shots are crystal clear. I may have to re-load film every 36 shots, but my battery never dies. The depth of field is astonishing.

The digital ‘revolution’ has created a world full of amateur photographers, and this isn’t necessarily a negative thing. I do however wonder how many people understand photography as art, photography as knowledge of projection, photography as combination of light and chemicals, photography as not shooting 200 and discarding 198.

Shooting on film with a camera that requires care and attention has revived my creative interest in photography, and my digital SLR photography can only benefit from the following thoughts:

Don’t waste a shot
Choose subjects carefully
If you choose to be avant-garde, use your equipment to its maximum potential
Frame
Choose your light with knowledge of the outcome
Experiment with care 

I own a Canon EOS 5D. And I love it. But this fully manual relic with it’s many intricate functions is like a friend that I have to nurture and encourage…

 

Abandoned Barn, Swiss Alps | Photo by Pete Foster

Abandoned Barn, Swiss Alps | Photo by Pete Foster

 

Tree Wall, Mountains | Photo by Pete Foster

Tree Wall, Mountains | Photo by Pete Foster

Morning Commute, B.C. | Photo by Pete Foster

Morning Commute, B.C. | Photo by Pete Foster

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